Feeds

Secret Windows 7 screens leaked?

Microsoft and the Jackson 5

3 Big data security analytics techniques

Despite Microsoft's efforts to keep Windows 7 information secret and safe within a close circle of partners and testers until its good and ready, another round of screenshots has found its way to the web.

Over the weekend, the ThinkNext.net blog posted a variety of screenshots purportedly from the latest batch of beta code, Windows 7 M3 Build 6780. Unfortunately, the page is now deader than disco. Someone claiming to be a Microsoft suit emailed the author and dropped enough litigious words of advice to encourage a hasty retreat.

But all is not lost, curious readers. Windows7news is presently hosting the images. You may catch them there before they're gone.

The images include a Windows 7 welcome screen, start menu, administration windows, and updated applications like Windows Media Player, and – YES! - MS Paint and Calculator!

All signs point to things looking pretty Aero-y. That is to say, Microsoft appears to be sticking with the same semi-transparent glass-effect graphic interface used in Windows Vista. You may also know this as the option in Appearance Settings you had to disable because it makes your laptop run like crap. The build does appear to be using the Office 2007 Ribbon interface in Wordpad and Paint. That's a change at least.

Keep in mind the code is still deep in beta country so nobody is promising you Aero. In fact, Microsoft is doing its best to promise you next to nothing this early into the process, having learned a harsh lesson with Vista.

Back before the ponderously maligned OS made its debut, Microsoft made a fine mess out of previewing thrills, chills, and a laundry list of features - along with a thousand elephants that didn't make the cut when Vista hit retail shelves. Customers couldn't help but compare the OS against their artificially enhanced expectations – adding to the grief that made Vista the Tito Jackson of Windows releases (Windows ME is Marlon Jackson, by the way).

We haven't yet received official word whether it was Microsoft that sent the take-down request. We'll update when the datum rolls around. ®

Update

A Microsoft spokeswoman responded that the company is "not aware" of issuing a take-down notice to ThinkNext. She added it's Microsoft's policy not to comment on rumors and speculation.

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Oh no, Joe: WinPhone users already griping over 8.1 mega-update
Hang on. Which bit of Developer Preview don't you understand?
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Half of Twitter's 'active users' are SILENT STALKERS
Nearly 50% have NEVER tweeted a word
Next Windows obsolescence panic is 450 days from … NOW!
The clock is ticking louder for Windows Server 2003 R2 users
Ditch the sync, paddle in the Streem: Upstart offers syncless sharing
Upload, delete and carry on sharing afterwards?
Microsoft TIER SMEAR changes app prices whether devs ask or not
Some go up, some go down, Redmond goes silent
Batten down the hatches, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS due in TWO DAYS
Admins dab straining server brows in advance of Trusty Tahr's long-term support landing
prev story

Whitepapers

SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.