Feeds

Met Office: Global warming sceptics 'have heads in sand'

Recent chill just a blip, insist weather prophets

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

The UK Met Office climate change bureau has issued a stinging attack on the idea that recent falls in global temperature might mean that global warming is over or has been exaggerated.

"Anyone who thinks global warming has stopped has their head in the sand," said an unnamed Met Office spokesman in a statement released online today. The statement goes on angrily:

Global warming does not mean that each year will be warmer than the last, natural phenomena will mean that some years will be much warmer and others cooler. You only need to look at 1998 to see a record-breaking warm year caused by a very strong El Niño. In the last couple of years, the underlying warming is partially masked caused [sic] by a strong La Niña.

The average global temperature has actually fallen a bit for the last two years, which has caused warmosceptics to suggest that the overall temperature rise since 1990 has been made too much of. The Met Office, which has also today released a pdf brochure entitled Global warming goes on, says that the falls of the last two years are no more than a temporary blip.

It might be possible to get the impression, reading the Reg, that there's a firm editorial policy at Vulture Central denying that climate change exists, that cutting carbon emissions would make sense even if it did, or even that oil will ever run out. However, there isn't any such policy. Rather, the Reg seems mainly to like being contrary*: and the Met Office, as a highly respected research institution, surely deserves to be heard on this matter.

That said, it's important to note that today's rather strident statement comes from the Met Office's subsidiary Hadley Centre, which exists purely to do climate change research. It is funded partly by the government and partly by taking fees from businesses to advise them on ways to cope with global warming.

If global warming has stopped or isn't very significant, therefore, everyone at the Hadley Centre is out of a job. Which might explain why they're so cross about the recent cooling. ®

Bootnote

* We on the vaguely-defence-related desk, for instance, would be unsurprised to see a big opinion piece soon saying that buying gas from Russia and oil from the Gulf will continue to have nothing but positive effects on Western society and its interactions with the rest of the world.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Our LOHAN spaceplane ballocket Kickstarter climbs through £8000
Through 25 per cent but more is needed: Get your UNIQUE rewards!
LOHAN tunes into ultra long range radio
And verily, Vultures shall speak status unto distant receivers
EOS, Lockheed to track space junk from Oz
WA facility gets laser-eyes out of the fog
Volcanic eruption in Iceland triggers CODE RED aviation warning
Lava-spitting Bárðarbunga prompts action from Met Office
NASA to reformat Opportunity rover's memory from 125 million miles away
Interplanetary admins will back up data and get to work
LOHAN Kickstarter breaks NINETEEN THOUSAND of your EARTH POUNDS
That's right, OVER 9,000 beer tokens - and counting
Major cyber attack hits Norwegian oil industry
Statoil, the gas giant behind the Scandie social miracle, targeted
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.