Feeds

Labour minister says 14 year olds should get ID cards

Deluges fringe meeting with Kool-Aid

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

A government minister has spoken glowingly of the prospect of kids as young as six handing over their biometrics as she boasted that the Tories and LibDems would find it impossible to unpick the government’s ID card scheme.

Meg Hillier, an under secretary at the Home Office, told a fringe meeting of tobacconists and convenience store owners at the Labour Party conference that cards could be foisted on given to 14-year-olds, the BBC reports.

Hillier pointed out that six year olds were already required to hand over their fingerprints as part of visa applications. While 16 and 17 year olds are due to be caught up in ID card plan, she said the age range was “up for grabs” and there was every possibility of its being lowered, if the cards were deemed popular.

If by popular she means that children will find themselves ostracised or unable to prove they are entitled to cut price travel without a card, she may well have a point.

Warming to her theme and no doubt ordering another vat of Kool-Aid, Hillier then told the meeting that the government was going “full steam ahead” with the plan and that Gordon Brown wanted to roll the scheme out “quicker than it was possible.”

Of course, the further the roll out, the harder it would be for a Tory government to roll the program back – assuming they did follow through on pledges to do just that.

“There isn’t an easy way to unpick this scheme, quite rightly because it is invaluable,” she bragged.

Quite right.

Despite what the civil libertarians say, what better use could there be of the government’s shrinking public purse than to ensure that newsagents can usefully enforce their two-children-at-a-time schemes and that off licence staff needn’t make their own judgements on what an 18 year old might look like? ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
GCHQ protesters stick it to British spooks ... by drinking urine
Activists told NOT to snap pics of staff at the concrete doughnut
Britain's housing crisis: What are we going to do about it?
Rent control: Better than bombs at destroying housing
Top beak: UK privacy law may be reconsidered because of social media
Rise of Twitter etc creates 'enormous challenges'
What do you mean, I have to POST a PHYSICAL CHEQUE to get my gun licence?
Stop bitching about firearms fees - we need computerisation
Redmond resists order to hand over overseas email
Court wanted peek as related to US investigation
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.