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Oracle sits big iron on Amazon cloud

Removes license hurdle

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OpenWorld 08 Oracle has eased licensing terms and introduced virtualization and back-up tools for using its database and infrastructure stack with Amazon's cloud services.

The database giant said existing customers can use Oracle Database 11g, its Fusion Middleware, and Oracle Enterprise Manager with Amazon's Compute Cloud (EC2) without need for an additional license.

Oracle has licensed products using a named-user or processor license model. These potentially mitigate against use of Oracle's products in a web-based environment, where customers must either cost out a system by number of users or pay for a larger server with accompanying big license in order to scale for the anticipated number of users.

The news is particularly handy for software developers, who can use Amazon's services with any existing Oracle infrastructure products without the expense of purchasing a new Oracle license.

The company also announced it planned to release a set of free Amazon Machine Images (AIMs) to provision virtual machines with Oracle Database 11g, Fusion Middleware, and Oracle's Enterprise Linux.

The target customer are developers, which Oracle said would be able to "rapidly" build applications for EC2 using tools such as its JDeveloper and Enterprise Pack for Eclipse.

Oracle additionally announced Secure Backup Cloud Module - based on Oracle's tape back-up management software - to back up data to Amazon's Simple Storage Service (S3).

Chuck Rozwat, Oracle executive vice president of Oracle product development, speaking earlier at OpenWorld said: "We've started to move and make available our complete Fusion Middleware stack on the Amazon cloud."

Keeping with the virtualization theme, meanwhile, Oracle announced the release of Oracle VM 2.1.2. Features include high-availability for guest systems, live migration of virtual machines to new physical servers, and the ability to convert Linux physical servers or VMware virtual machines to Oracle VM virtual machines. Pricing is on a per-system basis, starting at $599 per year for a machine with up to two processors and $1,199 for a machine with an unlimited number of CPUs per year. ®

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