Feeds

Danish court jails six in terror T-shirts case

Radical chic ends up in prison wear

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

A Danish court jailed five people for selling T-shirts to finance Palestinian and Colombian ‘terror’ organizations yesterday, suggesting the wrong clothing choice could land you in a orange jump suit in the future.

Defence lawyers for the T-shirt floggers said they would appeal the decision, all the way to Europe if necessary.

Six people in all were convicted of selling the T-shirts, and other apparel including caps, which proclaimed support for the Armed Forces of Colombia and the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, both of which are classed as terrorist organizations by both the US and EU.

Five people from the company Fighters + Lovers received sentences of between 60 days and six months for producing and selling the offending shirts, while a sixth person got 60 days for allowing the group to use his server for their website, according to the EU Observer.

A seventh defendant, who promoted the T-shirts on his hot dog stand, was acquitted.

The T-shirts originated as a challenge to Denmark’s terror laws. The producers quickly ended up in court, but were cleared by a Copenhagen court which said the activities of FARC and the PFLP did not meet Denmark’s definition of terrorism.

Just for the record – insofar as there is a reliable one for these matters - FARC began as a guerilla revolutionary movement, but nowadays is more associated with financing its operations via the cocaine trade and kidnapping or killing people associated with the Colombian authorities. It was most recently in the news when the Colombian government freed a bunch of hostages it had been holding for six years or more.

The PFLP gained notoriety for airline hijackings and bombings in the 1960s and 1970s. One of its members, Leila Khaled, was a pin-up for the more radical chic end of the West’s own counterculture warriors. It is still active in Palestinian politics.

One lawyer for the defendants condemned the court’s decision as “very provincial” and a “totally insane verdict”.

The T-shirt merchants had raised some €3,000 by selling its T-shirts, but the authorities seized it, along with their remaining stock, before it could be sent to the cause(s). ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Munich considers dumping Linux for ... GULP ... Windows!
Give a penguinista a hug, the Outlook's not good for open source's poster child
UK fuzz want PINCODES on ALL mobile phones
Met Police calls for mandatory passwords on all new mobes
e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt
Defeat to Raytheon branded 'catastrophic result'
EU justice chief blasts Google on 'right to be forgotten'
Don't pretend it's a freedom of speech issue – interim commish
Detroit losing MILLIONS because it buys CHEAP BATTERIES – report
Man at hardware store was right: name brands DO last longer
Snowden on NSA's MonsterMind TERROR: It may trigger cyberwar
Plus: Syria's internet going down? That was a US cock-up
UK government accused of hiding TRUTH about Universal Credit fiasco
'Reset rating keeps secrets on one-dole-to-rule-them-all plan', say MPs
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
Yes, but what are your plans if a DRAGON attacks?
Local UK gov outs most ridiculous FoI requests...
This'll end well: US govt says car-to-car jibber-jabber will SAVE lives
Department of Transportation starts cogs turning for another wireless comms standard
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.