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Oz woman sold mobe with preloaded smut

'It's sickening to think I've been using this phone near my face'

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

A Cairns university student got a bit of a shock when she popped into Dick Smith Electronics to buy a new mobe - the device contained 49 images of an extremely intimate nature.

They included "a woman naked from the waist down lying on a bed performing a sex act, a man holding his penis and consecutive shots of the woman in her bra and pulling her pants down".

Oz's Daily Telegraph explains that she'd been sold a display phone "because it was the last one in stock". She subsequently contacted the store "to complain that it was faulty because she could barely hear callers talking".

The paper elaborates: "She then accessed the phone's menu and discovered 49 images, including [a] female staff member in her Dick Smith Electronic uniform outside the store, two other people, and what is believed to be various interior shots of a hotel room."

The "shocked and disgusted" customer splendidly thundered: "It's sickening to think I've been using this phone near my face when it was used to take all of these photos. What would've happened if that phone was bought for a child?

"I'm not disgusted by what she did, what people do in their own homes is their business. But I'm disgusted that it was left on the shelf to be sold."

A Dick Smith Electronics spokesperson said: "We take any incidence of this nature very seriously and we will investigate it fully. We've asked the customer to bring us the phone to ascertain the nature of the images.

"Incidences like this are practically unheard of on new phones direct from the manufacturer. We'll decide on a course of action after the investigation is completed."

The spokesperson added that "the female staff member would not comment on the matter while the investigation is still under way".

The rattled victim and her partner "met with Dick Smith Electronic's area and state manager late yesterday in a bid to reach a compensation settlement but the company referred the matter to its legal department". ®

Bootnote

The Daily Telegraph has one of the offending snaps here. Don't get over-excited - it's heavily censored.

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