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Kodak launch world's first wireless OLED frame

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Updated Kodak has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s first digital wireless picture frame with an OLED display.

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Kodak's OLED wireless frame is a world's first

Unimaginatively entitled the Kodak OLED Wireless Frame, the gadget sports a 7.6in screen with 16:9 aspect ratio, 800 x 480 resolution and 180° viewing angle. The screen can display still images and videos, but is built into a stand with integrated speakers that let you add an audio accompaniment to your memories.

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The OLED display is super thin

Since the frame works over Wi-Fi, it can source pictures or videos from PCs in separate rooms and communicate with websites to gather, say, the weather report.

Content can also be loaded onto the frame’s 2GB internal storage capacity from memory cards and through a USB connection.

The Kodak OLED Wireless Frame will show up sometime before Christmas and cost £500 ($890/€630).

Update

Some readers have already commented on the price of Kodak's frame. So you'll be interested to learn that Kodak's just contacted Register Hardware with a price correction. It seems the frame won't cost £500, it'll be £600!

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