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Lenovo drops web sales of Linux machines

Built it and they didn't come

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Lenovo has dropped Linux from the list of operating systems it will preload on desktops and notebooks sold via its website.

The Chinese vendor will continue to sell Linux-based client machines through its channel organisation, and this is where the majority of Linux orders were coming from anyway.

The operation has been shipping Linux on client PCs since 2000. A Lenovo spokesman told ComputerWorld that its commitment to Linux had not changed. It’s just its commitment to letting customers express their commitment to Linux that’s changed, presumably.

The spokesman said online sales of Linux-based machines were just not hitting the numbers. However, it will continue to certify Novell and Red Hat’s flavours on its kit, and plans to extend this to Ubuntu.

Lenovo’s move can be written off as simply a rejigging of sales channels.

However, it is still one in the eye for Linux on the desktop acolytes. In this instance though, Lenovo built it, and they didn’t come. Not over the web anyway. ®

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