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World Camera offers enhanced reality via iPhone

Location-based social tagging hits the hood

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The iPhone again takes us where we've already been with the launch of the Sekia Camera - allowing users to post images, text, and audio locked to a specific location and accessed using enhanced reality.

The idea of using a mobile phone to record location-specific information is nothing new - TagandScan launched the same service in the UK back in 2003 - but Sekia Camera does present a nice interface. It overlays information on the camera view to show an enhanced version of reality that can be accessed with a tap of the screen.

Developer Tonchidot have provided a nice video showing how the application is intended to work:

It's hard to argue that additional information accessed in this way wouldn't be useful. Imagine climbing a hill in sunshine and accessing the same view in winter, or seeing what an area looks like after dark before buying a house there.

But such a service seems likely to fall foul of the problems besetting Yelp, both in terms of getting swamped with unreliable information and struggling to fund itself. ®

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