Feeds

Red Hat sprints past ESX on VM running

Oh Qumranet all ye faithful

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Red Hat claims it can run five virtual machines (VMs) for every three that VMware's ESX runs in the same server hardware. Qumranet technology also enables it to run more Windows virtual desktops than VMware, too.

At a journalists' roundtable in London this week, Benny Schnaider, Qumranet CEO, said his - now Red Hat's - company's KVM (kernel-based virtualisation machine) hypervisor runs 52 VMs in a physical server, in which ESX can host a maximum of 35 VMs. Citrix Xenserver is worse: it can only host 30.

There are two reasons why KVM is better than ESX, according to Schneider.

First, KVM is newer code: when it started being designed four years ago Intel and AMD were already extending their processor instruction sets to add virtualization-supporting instructions. Early hypervisors like ESX had to cope with the previous generation of CPU chips, which had no virtualisation support, and so were larger and made less efficient use of server resources.

In other words, VMware is held up by legacy code baggage, and Qumranet is not, or so Red Hat says.

Second, Windows needs lots of memory and is a bulky VM in RAM terms, according to Schneider. He hinted that KVM can reduce this Windows VM memory burden, freeing up RAM for other VMs.

Qumranet also provides Red Hat VDI (virtual desktop infrastructure) technology, which supports more remote desktops and gives the users a better experience because of its SPICE rendering technology. It compresses the desktop data stream better and enables a Linux server to be a better Windows VDI host than a VMware or Citrix Xenserver server. Red Hat CTO Brian Stevens acknowledged that it's a little odd that Red Hat's desktop strategy is now focused on the virtualized Windows desktop.

Paul Cormier, Red Hat's SVP for engineering, said Red Hat's strategy is to enable customers to virtualise everywhere if they so choose, from the Android cell phone to the desktop. He probably doesn't mean we'll be able to run Vista on Android, though.

Learn more about KVM here (pdf). ®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
You think the CLOUD's insecure? It's BETTER than UK.GOV's DATA CENTRES
We don't even know where some of them ARE – Maude
Want to STUFF Facebook with blatant ADVERTISING? Fine! But you must PAY
Pony up or push off, Zuck tells social marketeers
Oi, Europe! Tell US feds to GTFO of our servers, say Microsoft and pals
By writing a really angry letter about how it's harming our cloud business, ta
SAVE ME, NASA system builder, from my DEAD WORKSTATION
Anal-retentive hardware nerd in paws-on workstation crisis
Astro-boffins start opening universe simulation data
Got a supercomputer? Want to simulate a universe? Here you go
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Getting ahead of the compliance curve
Learn about new services that make it easy to discover and manage certificates across the enterprise and how to get ahead of the compliance curve.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.