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Sony debuts Bluetooth headphone duo

Cable-free life

Security for virtualized datacentres

Sony has cut the cord and launched two Bluetooth headphone designs, for anyone who favours a “sports and active” lifestyle.

Sony_DR-BT160AS

Sony's Bluetooth DR-BT160AS cans

Known as the DR-BT160AS and DR-BT14Q, the 160AS has a rigid connection between both earpieces, the 14Q’s earpieces are interconnected by a cable.

Features on both pairs are pretty similar, including the integrated microphone for answering calls. A splash-proof coating also means the cans won’t be affected by sweat or the odd spot of rain.

Sony_DR-BT140Q

A more conventional design for the DR-BT140Q

An “elastomer hanger” allows the 160AS headphones to hang comfortably around your ears, while the earpieces are adjustable to fit all sizes of ear. The 14Q’s ear-fixing style is described as “clip-on fit”, mimicking the design of Sony’s existing MDR-Q55SL cans.

Both headphone designs have audio controls on the outside for fingertip access to track skip, volume adjustment and so on.

Prices for either pair haven’t been unveiled yet, but Sony’s set to release them next month. A Bluetooth dongle kit – the DR-BT160iK – also enables the DR-BT160AS to stream music from your iPod.

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