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Philips creates a buzz with entry into marital aid market

Readies Warm Intimate Massager

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Which products do you think of when you think of Philips? TVs, electric razors and digital photo frames? Well, the electronics firm is now branching out into… ahem… “marital aids”.

According to a report by the Times, Philips has created a non-penetrative device called the Warm Intimate Massager (WIM).

Details are still scarce, but the WIM’s said to be “ergonomically crafted” and able to gently vibrate, with the aim of getting couples more in the mood for lurve than a 42in LCD panel ever will.

WIM will also be available in several pack options, including a “single”, “double” or couples version – which comes with three cordless rechargeable candle lights, apparently.

“We were looking for products that wouldn’t replace one or the other partner. With more targeted products one partner feels left out,” said Sheila Struyck, head of market-driven innovation at Philips.

Although development’s taken about two years, WIM will hit the shelves of Boots and Selfridges within the next ten days. WIM is expected to cost around £90 (€110/$160).

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