Feeds

French firm intros remix-friendly music format

Ogg-based MXP4 debuts

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Parisian technology company Musinaut has introduced what it hopes will be the digital music successor to the MP3 format.

Dubbed MXP4, the file type allows content owners to embed a whole lot more data than the MP3 format does, including lyrics, interactives and remixes of the song - Musinaut calls them "skins".

Each skin is created when the user chooses one of the skin options. The version of the track is mixed up there and then from the musical elements loaded into the file, according to the rules encoded by the artist.

Musinaut claimed, for instance, that a band might offer, say, rock, reggae, jazz and electro-pop skins of a song, stored as a set of six-track recordings. Each skin appears as a button in the player app. Clicking on a button triggers the remix, and playback commences once that's done. Skins can reflect musical genres, moods, locations or any other categorisation the artist fancies.

MXP4 mixing

Mixin' it: MXP4 Creator

Text and images can be set to appear in time with the music, allowing artists to embed "read-along, play-along and sing-along" information, Musinaut claimed.

Playback is free, thanks to a gratis player app - it runs under Windows and Mac OS X, but not Linux - though taking a track and turning it into a MXP4 file involves purchasing a £279 tool.

The audio within the MXP4 file is encoded in a choice of Ogg or WAV, depending on the quality:size balance the creator wants to strike.

All well and good, but does the world need another music format? Musinaut's pitch is that MXP4 will enable greater creativity. We can see it appealing to the kind of artist - and fans - who go in for endless remixes of a given song, but will ordinary listeners care?

Back in the 1990s, Todd Rungren released a CD that came with software that allowed fans to change the mood, style and tempo of each track to an almost infinite degree. It never established a trend.

And if any named MP3 player maker is to build support for MXP4 into their hardware - and surely that's essential to the format's success outside of a niche - Musinaut isn't saying so yet.

More at MXP4.com

Music player reviews
Pure Digital Evoke Flow internet radio
Creative Zen X-Fi 16GB media player
Orbitsound T12 soundbar
SanDisk Sansa Clip MP3 player

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
BBC: We're going to slip CODING into kids' TV
Pureed-carrot-in-ice cream C++ surprise
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Twitter: La la la, we have not heard of any NUDE JLaw, Upton SELFIES
If there are any on our site it is not our fault as we are not a PUBLISHER
Facebook, Google and Instagram 'worse than drugs' says Miley Cyrus
Italian boffins agree with popette's theory that haters are the real wrecking balls
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search
Prepare to HAUNT your pal's back catalogue
Ex-IBM CEO John Akers dies at 79
An era disrupted by the advent of the PC
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?