Feeds

Secure Computing snaps up user control firm Securify

Pimp My Firewall

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Security appliance firm Secure Computing has bought user access monitoring and control firm Securify, in a deal valued at up to $20m ($15m guaranteed in cash and stock, plus an earn-out of up to $5m).

Securify's appliance-based technology allows organisations to control and keep tabs on user access to applications. The technology integrates with Microsoft's Active Directory and features automatic discovery. Once plugged in, it provides alerts of unsanctioned application use and, dependent on policy, automatic blocking of applications or traffic through integration with either networking kit or firewalls.

Secure Computing plans to use the technology to develop more sophisticated firewall offerings that enforce business policy by providing a clearer picture over applications and user access, instead of looking only at protocols and IP addresses.

Existing clients for Securify's kit are mainly drawn from the federal government and financial services markets, much the same user base maintained by Secure Computing. More background on the deal, announced Wednesday and due to close in the fourth quarter of 2008, can be found here. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?