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Intel buys up UK Linux lab

A bird in the OpenedHand

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Intel has bought up OpenedHand, the UK-based Linux development company, folding its product line into the chip behemoth's mobile Linux effort, while promising to maintain its open-source developments.

OpenedHand specialises in squeezing Linux onto small devices, so is ideally placed to support the new generation of what Intel calls "Mobile Internet Devices". OpenedHand is a keen supporter of open source, both philosophically and practically, with various mobile-orientated projects on the go - all of which will, apparently, be supported by its new owner.

Intel will be quite happy to support such open developments; it doesn't make its money from software, and is concerned to see the way that software makes up an ever-increasing proportion of the cost of computing.

If we're all going to own Mobile Internet Devices, in addition to our laptops, desktops and media centres, then they're going to have to be cheap; using Linux is a reasonable way of driving down costs, particularly from Intel's point of view. ®

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