Feeds
80%

Nokia 6210 Navigator phone

Modest GPS-enabled mobile from Nokia

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

The high-speed mobile connectivity gives a boost to the 6210’s browser, as well as speeding up online Nokia Maps searches. The full web browser is pretty speedy at pulling up sites, and offers a choice of page rendering, including full page or mobile-optimised views, plus MiniMap page, pan and zoom options, and a toolbar for certain options. It’s a familiar Nokia smartphone experience, in fact.

The phone supports RSS feeds too. In addition, Nokia has included its own WidSets web-based widgets application, and pre-loaded the Yahoo! Go all-under-one-app email, info and web-services application.

Nokia 6210 Navigator

Press the blue star key for satellite navigation

The 6210 Navigator does come with a healthy amount of standard issue gear. The organiser features include calendar, notes, convertor, calculator, clock and alarm functions, plus voice recorder. Document viewers from QuickOffice and Adobe can open files copied over to the phone or received as email attachments, and there’s a neat dictionary that works with the on-board text-to-voice message reading function to pronounce words aloud.

Nokia estimates the battery life on this handset to vary between 3-5 hours of talktime, depending on whether it’s being used on a 3G or GSM network. It reckons on an optimum standby time of 231-244 hours, again depending on network. Limiting our satnav route finding, we managed a couple of days between charges with our typical usage patterns.

But as with any GPS-packing phone, sustained use of the satnav function will reduce battery power considerably quicker than normal phone use, and real-life power performance will depend on how heavily this – and other multimedia functions - are employed. If you’re using it for on the road navigation, we’d suggest getting a car charger.

Verdict

The 6210 Navigator is another attractively equipped GPS-enabled mobile from Nokia. It may lack the Wi-Fi connectivity and camera quality of some high-end Nokias, but it has a very decent mix of S60 smartphone functionality, high-speed HSDPA connectivity and user-friendly satellite navigation capability. It’s a sound, mid-range phone that has plenty of appeal.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

80%

Nokia 6210 Navigator phone

Nokia is heading in the right direction with its upgraded Navigator satnav phone.
Price: Contract: free - £50. Handset only: £250-280 RRP

More from The Register

next story
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Space Commanders rebel as Elite:Dangerous kills offline mode
Frontier cops an epic kicking in its own forums ahead of December revival
Intel's LAME DUCK mobile chips gobbled by CASH COW
Chipzilla won't have money-losing mobe unit to kick about anymore
First in line to order a Nexus 6? AT&T has a BRICK for you
Black Screen of Death plagues early Google-mobe batch
Ford's B-Max: Fiesta-based runaround that goes THUNK
... when you close the slidey doors, that is ...
Disturbance in the force lets phones detect gestures with Wi-Fi
These are the movement detection devices you're looking for
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Driving business with continuous operational intelligence
Introducing an innovative approach offered by ExtraHop for producing continuous operational intelligence.
5 critical considerations for enterprise cloud backup
Key considerations when evaluating cloud backup solutions to ensure adequate protection security and availability of enterprise data.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?