Feeds
80%

Nokia 6210 Navigator phone

Modest GPS-enabled mobile from Nokia

The Power of One Brief: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

Nokia Maps 2.0 is now a user-friendly and intuitive way of finding your way around. As well as being able to search and find addresses by road name of postcode, view them on the map and plan paths to them, you can search for businesses, entertainment venues, restaurants, services, tourist sites and so on. It’s a quick and efficient system - routes and favourite locations can be stored, and route instructions sent to other phones as messages.

With Drive and Walk activated you can get turn-by-turn voice guidance as you drive along. It looks good too, with the main viewpoint similar to what you’d expect from standard in-car satnav, with 3D and 2D views, night view options and simple turn only arrow option. Satellite views are also available, for a Google Maps-style overview.

Nokia 6210 Navigator

The 3.2-megapixel snapper: good, but not great

On the road, the satnav guidance system worked efficiently, locking firmly onto satellites as it was moving. Map transitions were smooth. The cranked-up loudspeaker was loud enough in the car for voice instructions to be audible.

In addition to the voice guidance package, Nokia offers add-on extras you can buy, including Lonely Planet city guides and traffic updates. While the Nokia Maps application will update mapping info over the air when you go outside of your preloaded map area, you can cut data costs by downloading other country maps using a PC and the supplied Nokia Map Loader software.

If camera quality is an issue in your buying decision, the 6210 Navigator doesn’t press all the high-end buttons Nokia’s five-megapixel Carl Zeiss lens snappers do - but it’s not bad.

The main 3.2-megapixel sits on the back panel - there’s a secondary front facing low-res camera above the display for 3G video calls - and clicking the camera button on the side of the phone auto-rotates the screen viewfinder into familiar horizontal mode. The phone has an LED flash rather than the more precise and powerfully illuminating xenon option used on Nokia’s top shooters.

Using blade systems to cut costs and sharpen efficiencies

More from The Register

next story
Report: American tech firms charge Britons a thumping nationality tax
Without representation, too. Time for a Boston (Lincs) Macbook Party?
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple ran off to IBM
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Apple gets patent for WRIST-PUTER: iTime for a smartwatch
It does everything a smartwatch should do ... but Apple owns it
Apple orders huge MOUNTAIN of 80 MILLION 'Air' iPhone 6s
Bigger, harder trouser bulges foretold for fanbois
Child diagnosed as allergic to iPad
Apple's fondleslab is the tablet dermatitis sufferers won't want to take
Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops
Redmond's chief salesman: We're taking 'hard' decisions
For Lenovo US, 8-inch Windows tablets are DEAD – long live 8-inch Windows tablets
Reports it's killing off smaller slabs are greatly exaggerated
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.