Feeds

FCC votes to silence 700MHz lurkers

Get your stuff and get out before Feb

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

The Federal Communication Commission has voted unanimously to ban the use of low-power transmitters operating in the 700MHz band from February next year, but wireless microphone users aren't going to go down without a fight.

The order (pdf) will particularly affect the 30 licensees who don't have anywhere else to go. The FCC reckons that the other 126 users currently hanging around 700MHz have access to other bands they can migrate to. But the order will also silence a lot of those using unlicensed wireless microphones, who might have a harder time finding space to play in.

The FCC also wants to ban the import, sale or shipment of devices that operate in 700MHz. This makes sense if you're going to make using the kit illegal, but won't do much to help those who've already paid for their wireless mics.

It's these who have prompted the Public Interest Spectrum Coalition (PISC) to lodge a complaint with the FCC, on which the commission is now seeking comment. The complaint accuses the companies that sold wireless microphones operating within 700MHz of "engaging in deceptive advertising practices designed to persuade ineligible users... that they could legally purchase and operate wireless microphones operating on vacant broadcast UHF Channels".

PISC wants those companies to help users transition to another frequency, and reckons the FCC should hold off criminalising users until that happens. It also wants some spectrum reserved for them to transition to, once they're forced out of 700MHz.

The increased efficiency licensed users are exploiting spectrum with is squeezing secondary users all over the world, though particularly in the USA, where geography has helped the toleration of unlicensed secondary users, at least until now. But having sold off 700MHz to the highest bidders last year, the FCC now has a responsibility to clear the area before the new tenants move in. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
Surprise: if you work from home you need the Internet
Buffer-rage sends Aussies out to experience road rage
EE buys 58 Phones 4u stores for £2.5m after picking over carcass
Operator says it will safeguard 359 jobs, plans lick of paint
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.