Feeds

BCS to review NHS IT for Tories

Calls for public input

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

Shadow health secretary Stephen O'Brien MP has commissioned an independent report from the British Computer Society on what English health service IT should look like in five years' time.

Beyond that patient-based records will form the basis of NHS informatics, no assumptions are being made, according the review's chair Dr Glyn Hayes, past chair of the BCS Health Informatics Forum.

"We are quite deliberately at this stage not talking about specific areas, we're talking about what people feel needs to be resolved," he told GC News. "Everyone is entitled to say whatever they like."

O'Brien's office is providing administrative support, but the report will be independent. "It will be fed into [the Conservatives'] own policy reviews, without any commitment to use it," said Hayes. "The BCS, like myself, is apolitical. We're happy to do it as it will help the whole community."

The review has invited groups including the royal colleges, health organisations, IT vendors, NHS Connecting for Health and academics to contribute formal written evidence to evidence@healthitpolicyreview.info, by 30 September.

It is asking members of the public to add to a wiki, although Hayes said individuals can email documents if they wish, adding that he hopes to draw on the experiences of Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. The review will take oral evidence later this year, which may be held in private, and the report is scheduled to be published in March 2009.

Hayes said that, with the Department of Health having published a recent review of informatics and the Conservative party forming its policies before the next election, it is a good time to be carrying out such a review.

He added that the aim is to look forward, rather than criticise the current situation. "If there are lessons we can learn, fine, but we're not there to do a dissection of what is there at the moment. We are where we are - how do we move forward?"

Hayes will be joined by independent consultant Gail Beer, pharmacist Ian Shepherd and professors Iain Carpenter and John Williams of the Royal College of Physicians in running the review.

This article was originally published at Kablenet.

Kablenet's GC weekly is a free email newsletter covering the latest news and analysis of public sector technology. To register click here.

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

More from The Register

next story
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Top beak: UK privacy law may be reconsidered because of social media
Rise of Twitter etc creates 'enormous challenges'
Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy
Casual labour and tired ideas = not really web-tastic
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
Don't even THINK about copyright violation, says Indian state
Pre-emptive arrest for pirates in Karnataka
The police are WRONG: Watching YouTube videos is NOT illegal
And our man Corfield is pretty bloody cross about it
Oz biz regulator discovers shared servers in EPIC FACEPALM
'Not aware' that one IP can hold more than one Website
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.