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Fujitsu intros 5.6in bonsai laptop... with Vista

Even more wee than the Eee

Security for virtualized datacentres

Updated Fujitsu's Japanese customers will soon be able to get their mitts on one of the most stylish - and tiniest - Atom-based mini-laptops we've seen: the LifeBook FMV Biblo U/B50.

Fujitsu FMV Biblio U/B50

Fujitsu FMV Biblio U/B50: Atom powered

The compact machine sports a 5.6in display that's nonetheless capable of a 1280 x 800 resolution. The screen has an integrated webcam

The machine incorporates not the 'Diamondville' Atom usually found in Small, Cheap Computers, but the 1.6GHz Atom Z530, a 'Silverthorne' chip designed for what Intel calls "mobile internet devices".

Fujitsu FMV Biblio U/B50

Only a 5.6in screen, but it still runs Vista

The U/B50 has 802.11n Wi-Fi and Bluetooth on board - and 3G communications too. It can drive a telly thanks to its HDMI port.

Incredibly, the thing runs Windows Vista. It's got a gig of Ram on board, and buyers can choose either a 1.8in hard drive of 60, 100 or 120GB capacity, or a 64GB solid-state drive for storage.

The U/50 measures 171 x 135 x 26.5-33mm. With a 2900mAh battery, it weighs 562g. An optional, 5800mAh power pack raises the weight to 663.5g.

And prices? The base 60GB HDD model costs ¥123,800 ($1134/£609/€767), and you can add ¥20,000 ($183/£98/€124) and ¥22,000 ($202/£108/€136) to that for the 100GB and 120GB models, respectively.

Want the SSD model? It'll set you back a cool ¥273,800 ($2509/£1346/€1697). Small yes, cheap no...

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