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Sqweeze your way to Wii fitness

Wacky add-on promises upper body strength

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Many gamers claim that the Wii makes them fitter. But now an add-on’s in development that promises you the pecs you've always dreamed of.

Wii_sqweeze

InterAction Laboratories' Wii Sqweeze
Picture courtesy Exergamelab

At the GC Developers Conference, held in Leipzig this week, a blogger spied and tried an add-on called the Wii Sqweeze. The Remote slots into it horizontally and the user then pushes together or pulls apart two rubber handles, according to the on screen action.

The blogger noted that Wii Sqweeze mimics isometric movement – a form of exercise that helps to build-up your muscles, such as bench presses. He said the handles have a maximum movement range of between two and three inches, but how much resistance they can provide is anyone’s guess.

Apparently Wii Sqweeze is being developed by InterAction Laboratories, a firm that already produce a range of console peripherals and a separate set of exercise tools. So perhaps Wii Sqweeze is its attempt at creating a third division?

Wii Sqweeze isn't expected to be available until next year, so you can strike the muscle motivator add-on off of your Christmas list.

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