Feeds

National DNA database grows on the genes of the innocent

Kids swell numbers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Almost 600,000 genetic profiles taken from innocent people have helped swell the National DNA Database to cover about seven per cent of the UK population.

Home Office figures also reveal that DNA profiles from 39,095 children who have never been charged, cautioned or formally reprimanded are now on the database indefinitely. Two years ago there were 24,000 profiles from ten to 17-year-olds stored.

In 2004 police were granted powers to take DNA from everyone they arrest irrespective of the outcome of the investigation. According to the data released by junior Home Office minister Meg Hillier, almost half of profiles retained in the last two years are from such cases.

Opposition parties criticised the policy. Liberal Democrat home affairs spokesman Chris Huhne said: "There can be no excuse for storing the DNA of innocent adults, let alone children, who are entirely blameless." The Tories called on the government to allow a parliamentary debate on the issue.

That could prove unnecessary, however. A legal challenge by two Sheffield men is currently under consideration by the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg. If it finds in their favour the government could be forced to remove all the DNA profiles it retains from innocent people. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Snowden, Dotcom, throw bombs into NZ election campaign
Claim of tapped undersea cable refuted by Kiwi PM as Kim claims extradition plot
Heavy VPN users are probably pirates, says BBC
And ISPs should nab 'em on our behalf
Former Bitcoin Foundation chair pleads guilty to money-laundering charge
Charlie Shrem plea deal could still get him five YEARS in chokey
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.