Feeds

Intel roadmaps hi-speed SSDs

170MB/s write speed, anyone?

Security for virtualized datacentres

Intel is preparing solid-state drives with sustained read and write speeds of 240MB/s and 70MB/s, respectively.

The gen comes from what's claimed to be a leaked roadmap slide that was subsequently posted by website Expreview.

Intel's SSD scheme calls for the release of the laptop-friendly 2.5in X25-M in Q3 alongside a 1.8in version, the X18-M. Both will be made available in 80GB capacities. In Q4, Intel will offer a 160GB X25-M, but the comparable capacity X18-M won't debut until Q1 2009.

The two drives are said to consume no more than a quarter of a Watt when they're active, with their power consumption dropping to 0.06W when they're idle.

In Q4, Intel will also introduce the enterprise-oriented X25-E in 32GB and 64GB capacities but with a write speed of 170MB/s. The roadmap quote 4Kb read and write IOPS scores of 35,000 and 3,300, respectively.

Intel's SSD specs match those of the latest solid-state drives from its Flash memory partner, Micron. The memory specialist announed the P200 and C200, a couple of weeks ago, though they won't be shipping in volume until Q4.

Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.