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Samsung SGH-F400 music phone

Bang & Olufsen speakers on a handset? Oh yes.

In camera mode, the navpad provides four shortcuts: flash, timer (up to ten seconds), icons toggle (on-screen camera settings on or off, plus framing guidelines) and brightness. If you slide the keypad out there are also numeric shortcuts for most of the other settings, including multi-shot and panorama modes, and effects.

Picture quality was perfectly fine in good light, though as might be expected it struggled a little in dimmer conditions, suffering perhaps a little too readily from grain. Video fared less well since it only offers a 320 x 240 resolution, which is only ever really much use in an emergency.

Samsung SGH-F400

On the side is a Micro SD card slot, boosting the onboard memory up to 8GB

There's a fairly decent little list of picture editing options, allowing you to add blur - if it's not there already - and tone effects over part or all of your pics; adjust brightness, tone and colour; rotate and flip the shot; and adjust the resolution. You can also crop your pics and add frames, text, clip art or emoticons, plus you can print directly from the phone via Bluetooth or USB.

Battery life is decent if not spectacular for this level of handset, granting us a little over three days of moderate use. Call quality was entirely fine.

Verdict

Samsung's F400 is a bad music-centred phone with a nice N95-esque dual slide action, plus FM radio and a fairly good three-megapixel camera. Its music chops are a little way behind the best of Sony Ericsson's Walkman series or Apple's iPhone, but at least it's nudging into the same ballpark.

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Samsung SGH-F400 music phone

Bang & Olufsen hi-fi know-how boosts an otherwise fairly so-so music sliderphone.
Price: Contract: from free. Handset only: £200 RRP