Feeds

Intel blogger slams employer over G45 IGP issues

Firm off the hook on Blu-ray complaints, though

The Power of One Infographic

If you've bought a PC based around Intel's G45 chipset - desktop or mobile - and your Blu-ray Disc performance is pants, change your software, the chip giant has suggested.

The remedy comes from a staffer and blogger called Aaron Brezenski, now achieving his 15 minutes of fame thanks to a couple of grumbles he's made about other aspects of the chipset's integrated graphics sub-system.

First, Blu-ray, clearly Brezenski's specialism. Noting a couple of other organisations have highlighted very high CPU utilisation while playing BDs on G45-based rigs - a sure sign the GPU's not accelerating the process, as it's advertised to be able to do - Intel's man says applying the correct Bios settings ensure the GPU does enable the missing hardware acceleration highlighted by the company's critics.

Bios tweaks are all very well, but they're not for the average user. We hope, therefore, that Intel's G45 customers, the mobo makers, are applying said tweaks to the Bios settings in shipping products.

Beyond the Bios tweaks, Brezenski claimed using better player software with "properly configured advanced de-interlacing" can push an HD Hollywood Quality Video (HQV) benchmark score from a poor 30 per cent to 50 per cent or more, a rather better results. Still not perfect, he admits, but he said he hopes future driver updates will improve matters further.

Still, the fellow's not without crits of his own, specifically the G45 GPU's poor 24p - 24 frames a second - performance and "broken" 7.1 sound send from the chipset over HDMI to an HD TV via a set-top box.

It's the 'via' bit that's the problem, he says. This uses "repeater mode" to relay the HDMI stream, and Intel's chipset doesn't support repeater mode because the Certified Output Protection Protocol (COPP) spec doesn't support it.

Unfortunately. AMD's GPUs do, leading Brezenski to the conclusion "we are sunk in the Home Threatre PC space if the home user can't get their equipment to even work with our graphics, or have to buy hacker software to do so. Even if we're not the root cause".

He adds: "The G45 is really the perfect home theater chipset... But it galls me to see such great work marred by two issues which seem correctable but which are still extant."

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
Child diagnosed as allergic to iPad
Apple's fondleslab is the tablet dermatitis sufferers won't want to take
Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops
Redmond's chief salesman: We're taking 'hard' decisions
For Lenovo US, 8-inch Windows tablets are DEAD – long live 8-inch Windows tablets
Reports it's killing off smaller slabs are greatly exaggerated
Seventh-gen SPARC silicon will accelerate Oracle databases
Uncle Larry's mutually-optimised stack to become clearer in August
EU dons gloves, pokes Google's deals with Android mobe makers
El Reg cops a squint at investigatory letters
Big Blue Apple: IBM to sell iPads, iPhones to enterprises
iOS/2 gear loaded with apps for big biz ... uh oh BlackBerry
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.