Feeds

Aussies: Eat roos, save the planet

What's that Skippy? You go with horseradish and mint sauce?

Security for virtualized datacentres

Australian scientists have recommended their beef-loving compatriots switch to kangaroo meat to clamp down on the methane emissions that bovine burger precursors pump out into the atmosphere.

The gastro-switch will simultaneously turn what most Aussies consider a particularly large form of vermin into a profitable agricultural export.

George Wilson and Melanie Edwards, of eco consultancy Australian Wildlife Services, propose the scheme in the conservation biology journal, Conservation Letters.

They claim that enteric methane (burps and farts) from ruminants, mainly cows and sheep, account for 67 per cent of the Aussie agricultural sector’s methane emissions and 11 per cent of Australia’s total emissions. Methane is an even more powerful greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide.

Wilson and Edwards reckon that “removing seven million cattle and 36 million sheep by 2020" would reduce Australia’s annual greenhouse emissions by three per cent.

But what would Aussies chuck on the barbie instead?

Easy. Allowing the roo population on “rangelands where harvesting occurs” to shoot up to 175 million would easily yield the same amount of meat. This would also benefit the local environment, kangaroos being a native species. In fact, should roo meat really catch on, the authors reckon the removal of sheep and cows would mean the rangelands could actually support up to 240 million kangaroos.

The authors go on to point out other benefits – all those fiddly fences, branding, shearing, stud fees and the rest. Kangaroos being free-ranging, it seems all the farmers would have to do is wander out onto their land and bag a few, every time the meat truck is due to deliver. Also, kanga hides apparently have a better strength-to-weight ratio than those of cattle, though we’re not sure roo wool is up to much.

At the same time, asking farmers to switch to livestock that has a habit of upping and leaving whenever the mood takes it might just be a tough sell. And that’s before you ask the public to tuck into the kanga-kebab. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
SECRET U.S. 'SPACE WARPLANE' set to return from SPY MISSION
Robot minishuttle X-37B returns after almost 2 years in orbit
LOHAN crash lands on CNN
Overflies Die Welt en route to lively US news vid
America's super-secret X-37B plane returns to Earth after nearly TWO YEARS aloft
674 days in space for US Air Force's mystery orbital vehicle
'Utter killjoy Reg hacks have NEVER BEEN LAID', writes a fan
'Shuddit, smarty pants!' Some readers reacted badly to our last Doctor Who review ...
Experts brand LOHAN's squeaky-clean box
Phytosanitary treatment renders Vulture 2 crate fit for export
Carry On Cosmonaut: Willful Child is a poor taste Star Trek parody
Cringeworthy, crude and crass jokes abound in Steven Erikson’s sci-fi debut
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Win a year’s supply of chocolate
There is no techie angle to this competition so we're not going to pretend there is, but everyone loves chocolate so who cares.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.