Feeds

Nokia's Trolltech renews Windows mobile vows

No Symbian monogamy

The Power of One Infographic

LinuxWorld Nokia-owned Trolltech has re-committed its Qt cross-platform application framework and toolkit to Windows.

Trolltech's developer tools community manager Knut Yrvin told The Reg deep in the bowels of LinuxWorld it made healthy business sense to continue supporting Microsoft.

"It would be unwise not to take Microsoft's mobile software initiative seriously," he said. Trolltech has 5,500 customers on Windows.

"You don't dismiss those - that would be an unhealthy commercial decision."

According to Yrvin, Trolltech's role is to continue bridging open- and closed-source platforms. He pointed out open source applications can run on Windows.

Nokia announced it was buying Trolltech in January in what soon became clear was the first step in a strategy to ramp up its own mobile software efforts and shake-up the Symbian alliance primarily in a bid against Apple's iPhone and Microsoft's Windows.

The world's largest handset manufacturer went on to announce its purchase of, and plans to open source, the Symbian operating system that it and other handset and service providers have adopted.

Nokia makes no use of Windows on phones and devices, so the question has to be asked why it would wish to continue funding Trolltech's work on a mobile platform it does not support.

The more speculative among you might even conjecture that keeping Qt on Windows leaves the door open for Nokia to put Windows on its phones, providing a ready-made framework, toolkit and developer ecosystem. Continued support for Windows would also benefit those in the new Symbian world order also backing Windows.

Turning to the iPhone, Yrvin, said it would be simple from a technology perspective to put Qt on Apple's device, as it already works on the Mac. He was not aware of any talks with Apple, though, to put the framework and toolkit on Apple's closed mobile platform.®

The Power of One eBook: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

More from The Register

next story
GoTenna: How does this 'magic' work?
An ideal product if you believe the Earth is flat
Google Nest, ARM, Samsung pull out Thread to strangle ZigBee
But there's a flaw in Google's IP-based IoT system
Orange spent weekend spamming customers with TXTs
Zero, not infinity, is the Magic Number customers want
US freemium mobile network eyes up Europe
FreedomPop touts 'free' calls, texts and data
Want to beat Verizon's slow Netflix? Get a VPN
Exec finds stream speed climbs when smuggled out
'Two-speed internet' storm turns FCC.gov into zero-speed website
Deadline for comments on net neutrality shake-up extended to Friday
NBN Co execs: No FTTN product until 2015
Faster? Not yet. Cheaper? No data
prev story

Whitepapers

Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.