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Hyperic claims XenServer 'first'

Expands VMware management circle

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LinuxWorld Hyperic will claim a first this week when it adds support for Citrix Systems' XenServer virtualization stack to its open-source monitoring and management suite.

Hyperic HQ for XenServer, due to be announced today, will provide information on performance, logs, configuration and security from host machines and virtual instances for management and to generate alerts, inside Hyperic's management dashboard.

Currently available as a separate plug-in, Hyperic HQ for XenServer will be added to the core Hyperic HQ distribution with version 4.0, due to be released this summer.

The company claimed the fusion of its reporting and management tools, wrapped in its support services, means it's the first to provide "enterprise-class" management and monitoring for XenServer, acquired by Citrix with XenSource a year ago this month.

Hyperic already provides monitoring and management for market-leader VMware. The company expects to find uptake for its latest product among a percentage of VMware users it claims are also running the open-source XenServer.®

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