Feeds

George Orwell joins blogging fray

Daily musings of mighty writer imminent

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

George Orwell's diaries are to be made available online as a blog, starting from next Saturday.

The author, whose incisive and ominous political writing ensured his name's appearance in any piece of text with the words 'liberties' and 'civil' for all eternity, kept a journal between 1938 and 1942. The first entry will be posted online on 9 August, 70 years to the day after the great man penned it, according to The Telegraph.

Orwell, in common with most many a few more canny modern bloggers, sensibly kept his personal scribblings separate from his political thoughts, which he started keeping note of on 7 September 1938. The blog, which will show one entry a day as Orwell wrote them, is being published by the website of The Orwell Prize, given for political writing. (The site's somewhat woolly announcement is here, but then they are excited, bless 'em.)

As several the majority of all 21st century bloggers do, the great man noted plenty of mundane quotidian details for posterity. The Today programme on BBC Radio 4 previewed the online event with readings of extracts by Orwell's son Richard Blair (yes, the irony is noted), from which listeners learned that 22 August 1938 was a "warmish day, with showers". The writer of the seminal Nineteen Eighty-Four and Animal Farm went on to consider in some detail the anatomy of the "enormous" slugs* that emerged after the rain.

However, such humdrum potterings soon give way to typically searing and engaging personal accounts - the diaries cover the start of the Second World War, along with Orwell's travels to Morocco after being injured fighting in the Spanish Civil War. In all the diaries promise further insight into a fascinating figure, and will no doubt become the only thing worth reading online except for all those other brilliant personal blogs by political geniuses you have bookmarked.

Readers expecting this piece to end on some zinger about Big Brother will be sorely disappointed and/or summarily dispatched to Room 101. ®

Bootnote

* Orwell's fascination with hermaphroditic gastropods almost led to a pivotal role for them in Animal Farm, but he was dissuaded when he realised that "Four legs good, no legs better" lacked that certain something.

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Forget the beach 'n' boardwalk, check out the Santa Cruz STEVE JOBS FOUNTAIN
Reg reader snaps shot of touching tribute to Apple icon
Oz bank in comedy Heartbleed blog FAIL
Bank: 'We are now safely patched.' Customers: 'You were using OpenSSL?'
Happy 40th Playmobil: Reg looks back at small, rude world of our favourite tiny toys
Little men straddle LOHAN, attend tiny G20 Summit... ah, sweet memories...
Lego is the TOOL OF SATAN, thunders Polish priest
New minifigs like Monster Fighters are turning kids to the dark side
Dark SITH LORD 'Darth Vader' joins battle to rule, er, Ukraine
Only I can 'make an empire out of a republic' intones presidential candidate
Chinese company counters pollution by importing fresh air
Citizens line up for bags of that sweet, sweet mountain air
Google asks April Fools: Want a job? Be our 'Pokemon Master'
Mountain View is prankin' like it's 1999...
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.