Feeds

Tardy Apple finally releases DNS patch

Cache from chaos

3 Big data security analytics techniques

Apple has finally gotten around to defending against a high-profile Domain Name System flaw, days after security researchers called it out for dragging its heels on releasing a patch.

The Mac OS X security update issued by Apple on Thursday defends against the infamous DNS poisoning issue, discovered by security researcher Dan Kaminsky, by implementing source port randomisation. The update addresses the Apple end of a cross vendor patching effort by updating the Berkeley Internet Name Domain (BIND) DNS software bundled with Apple's operating system.

Patching efforts to thwart cache poisoning exploits, which arise from security shortcomings in the DNS protocol itself rather than coding errors by individual vendors, began on 8 July. The Internet Systems Consortium, which maintains BIND, was among the vendors that worked together with Kaminsky in secret beforehand and made patches available from day one. Apple's update some three weeks later comes only after the flaw has become the target of active exploitation by hackers.

Successful exploitation of the flaw allows miscreants to redirect surfers to potentially malicious websites in a way that leaves users unaware anything has gone awry. Security watchers hammered Apple for failing to do its bit earlier this week, a factor that may well have accelerated the availability of Apple's update.

Apple's Security Update 08-005 also addresses a range of lower profile security flaws, including flaws in CardonCore and CoreGraphics that each pose a code injection risk, as explained in an overview by security notification firm Secunia here. The software also includes an upgrade to PHP 5.2.6, available as a stand-alone update since 1 May, and fixes for flaws in Apple's implementation of OpenSSL.

Various flavours of the update are available for systems running Mac OS X Server versions 10.4 and 10.5 as well as Mac OS X 10.4.11 and Mac OS X 10.5.4. Apple's summary of the update can be found here.

Apple's developers have had a lot on their plate of late - not least fine-tuning version 2 of the iPhone software and dealing with a series of problems involving the .Mac-to-MobileMe migration - a factor that may account for its delay in updating its software to deal with the DNS patch, Apple watchers note. ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Samsung Galaxy S5 fingerprint scanner hacked in just 4 DAYS
Sammy's newbie cooked slower than iPhone, also costs more to build
Putin tells Snowden: Russia conducts no US-style mass surveillance
Gov't is too broke for that, Russian prez says
Snowden-inspired crypto-email service Lavaboom launches
German service pays tribute to Lavabit
Mounties always get their man: Heartbleed 'hacker', 19, CUFFED
Canadian teen accused of raiding tax computers using OpenSSL bug
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
Heartbleed exploit, inoculation, both released
File under 'this is going to hurt you more than it hurts me'
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.