Feeds

Microsoft claims heart beats in open source

If you ignore Windows

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

If Microsoft has a beating heart then the senior director of Microsoft platform strategy Sam Ramji reckons he's found it.

Where's that heart? Inside Microsoft's open source activities.

Ramji believes Microsoft's recruitment of doers from the world of open source and their placement inside its Open Source Software Lab means Microsoft has the experience and commitment to support Linux and open source and work on their interoperability with Windows for the long term.

These doers include the former IBM Linux kernel engineering manager and Linux Foundation and Open Source Development Lab (OSDL) engineering director Tom Hanrahan.

"I feel like we've got a beating heart that is the core of what we are going to be doing for the next couple of years," Ramji told the chap leading Sun Microsystems' own relationship with the GNU/Linux communities Barton George in a podcast recorded at the O'Reilly Open Source Convention (OSCON).

Speaking separately to The Reg at OSCON, Ramji said he's also been telling Microsoft's sales and marketing people how the company can work with open source. The argument goes a little like this: open source applications can be made to run well on "infrastructure software" like Windows and SQL Server and there can be interop with Linux, and Microsoft can still make money.

Ramji said he's "helping employees understand it's not about allegiance to Visual Studio. The community is building applications using Emacs and Zend". In the past, Microsoft had made the mistake of not being agnostic. He recounted how he got a phone call that Microsoft risked losing the Open University as a Windows customer to Linux simply because it was bringing in open-source content management system Moodle.

"We need to engage with Windows administrators - this stuff runs on Windows," Ramji said.

For more from Ramji on how Microsoft surrendered sovereignty to the Open Source Initiative, on chief executive Steve Ballmer's apparent rapprochement with open source - just don't mention the "L" word - and how Microsoft won't be open sourcing Windows, you can download George's 11 minute podcast here

Bridging the IT gap between rising business demands and ageing tools

More from The Register

next story
NO MORE ALL CAPS and other pleasures of Visual Studio 14
Unpicking a packed preview that breaks down ASP.NET
Secure microkernel that uses maths to be 'bug free' goes open source
Hacker-repelling, drone-protecting code will soon be yours to tweak as you see fit
KDE releases ice-cream coloured Plasma 5 just in time for summer
Melty but refreshing - popular rival to Mint's Cinnamon's still a work in progress
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
Put down that Oracle database patch: It could cost $23,000 per CPU
On-by-default INMEMORY tech a boon for developers ... as long as they can afford it
Another day, another Firefox: Version 31 is upon us ALREADY
Web devs, Mozilla really wants you to like this one
Google shows off new Chrome OS look
Athena springs full-grown from Chromium project's head
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.