Feeds

Only 'unlawful threats' would invalidate McKinnon extradition

Ordinary threats not enough

High performance access to file storage

Lord Brown goes on to argue that McKinnon might be facing an equally serious offence even if he was tried in the UK, the outcome his legal team and campaigners are seeking:

As the Divisional Court itself pointed out, the gravity of the offences alleged against the appellant should not be understated: The equivalent domestic offences include an offence under section 12 of the Aviation and Maritime Security Act 1990 for which the maximum sentence is life imprisonment. True, the disparity between the consequences predicted by the US authorities dependent upon whether the appellant cooperated or not was very marked... But the discount would have to be very substantially more generous than anything promised here (as to the way the case would be put and the likely outcome) before it constituted unlawful pressure such as to vitiate [invalidate] the process. So too would the predicted consequences of non-cooperation need to go significantly beyond what could properly be regarded as the defendant’s just desserts on conviction for that to constitute unlawful pressure.

The Lords considered a Canadian Supreme Court case (USA v Cobb [2001]) where extradition proceedings against fraud suspects to the US were curtailed after a US prosecutor was found to have threatened suspects that they'd be placed in a situation where they could expect prison rape unless they agreed to voluntary deportation. A US judge in the same case vowed to hand down maximum sentences to anyone convicted after resisting deportation.

The offer made to McKinnon hardly deserves to be considered as anywhere near comparable, Lord Brown ruled:

The differences between this case and Cobb are striking. In Cobb it was the judge who stated that non-cooperation would result in "the absolute maximum jail sentence that the law permits me to give" and he, after all, unlike the prosecuting authority, had the power to pass sentence. And in Cobb the prosecutor, so far from forewarning the defendant of the differing consequences which could be expected to follow (perfectly properly) from his decision whether or not to cooperate, effectively threatened (and here I use the word advisedly) those not cooperating with homosexual rape.

Following the plea bargain talks between McKinnon, his legal team, and US prosecutors, other US legal officials have made undertakings that the threat to oppose repatriation will not be carried through. Lord Brown concludes nothing much less than threats of assault against McKinnon, or other extradition targets, would taint the extradition process:

In my judgment it would only be in a wholly extreme case like Cobb itself that the court should properly regard any encouragement to accused persons to surrender for trial and plead guilty, in particular if made by a prosecutor during a regulated process of plea bargaining, as so unconscionable as to constitute an abuse of process justifying the requested state’s refusal to extradite the accused. It is difficult, indeed, to think of anything other than the threat of unlawful action which could fairly be said so to imperil the integrity of the extradition process as to require the accused, notwithstanding his having resisted the undue pressure, to be discharged irrespective of the strength of the case against him.

McKinnon and his legal team have vowed to lodge an appeal at the European Court of Human Rights. The use of threats made by US authorities during the plea bargaining process and the concern that McKinnon may face a military tribunal, rather than a civil court, if he is extradited to the US, will be the two grounds of appeal.

Unless the European court intervenes with a stay in proceedings McKinnon faces the prospect of deportation in less than a month.

McKinnon (aka SOLO), a self-confessed computer hacker, was first arrested six and a half years ago after allegedly hacking into 97 computer systems run by the US armed forces and NASA in what prosecutors described as the biggest military hack ever. McKinnon claims to have broken into systems only to uncover confidential information about anti-gravity propulsion systems and UFO tech he reckoned the US military was hiding from the public. ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Putin tells Snowden: Russia conducts no US-style mass surveillance
Gov't is too broke for that, Russian prez says
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Whoever you vote for, Google gets in
Report uncovers giant octopus squid of lobbying influence
Lavabit loses contempt of court appeal over protecting Snowden, customers
Judges rule complaints about government power are too little, too late
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Don't let no-hire pact suit witnesses call Steve Jobs a bullyboy, plead Apple and Google
'Irrelevant' character evidence should be excluded – lawyers
EFF: Feds plan to put 52 MILLION FACES into recognition database
System would identify faces as part of biometrics collection
Ex-Tony Blair adviser is new top boss at UK spy-hive GCHQ
Robert Hannigan to replace Sir Iain Lobban in the autumn
Alphadex fires back at British Gas with overcharging allegation
Brit colo outfit says it paid for 347KVA, has been charged for 1940KVA
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.