Feeds

It's official: The Home Office is listening

And will officially ignore anything you say

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

As for the claim that no “new information” is created, only “undiscovered links”, we must assume that the author of this report is unaware of the “jigsaw” concept that is central to Official Secrets legislation. This makes it a criminal offence for an individual to take two or more unrelated (and unclassified) pieces of information and put them together to create a conclusion that is “secret”.

Presumably what is good enough for official information is not good enough for personal information.

Of course you can say no...

Another very large timebomb buried in the Home Office report includes the suggestion that “public authorities need to be very careful about relying on consent {for the processing of data}, as the requirement can be complex to apply and it is often difficult to be sure than an individual has genuinely consented”.

Translation: If the buggers won’t agree to let government process their data, remove their right to say no!

There is plenty of fine waffle in support of guidelines, high level reviews and impact assessments – although it is hard to shake the sense that wherever any of these come into conflict with what government wants, they will end up being no obstacle at all.

As the Home Office quite rightly says, it will have no time for “fishing trips” or attempts to use information in new ways to deal with a new issue. Oh no. Data would only be used in this way where an “objective” need is identified.

And on and on and on. Individual rights when it comes to DNA? Victims might not understand. Public concern about how personal communications are intercepted? The Home Office plans not to do less of it, but to “raise awareness” of the benefits such practices can bring.

For a government committed to listening, this is a pretty poor show. Or perhaps not. They have clearly heard the arguments against their approach, but, as Sir Neville-Kingdom puts it, they are “confident they can get {the public} back on-side”.

How? Just keep repeating the same bland reassurance and take no notice of substantive criticism. In time, it will all just fade away. ®

Application security programs and practises

More from The Register

next story
ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION
Environmental activist walks free after hoax sent share price over a cliff
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.