Feeds

Airbus A380-800: an airborne treat for gadget fans

Tech heaven at 37,000ft

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Security for virtualized datacentres

I’m writing this sitting in a Singapore Airlines double-decker Airbus A380 bound for the carrier’s home city. We’re at 35,320ft and I’m up in tech heaven.

I have my Eee PC 900 open in front of me, its meagre battery being kept topped up from the power socket in the armrest to my right. My iPhone is sitting on the fold-out table next to the Eee — it’s being charged from the USB port to the right of the large, crisp, decent-resolution seat-back LCD.

There’s a light under the screen that, when activated, provides illumination for my keyboard. If the Eee had a video input, I could hook it up to the TV-out port next to the seat-back display and watch the in-flight flicks on my laptop’s screen. Not that it’s worth it in this case — the seat-back screen is larger than the one on the Eee.

If I’d remembered my Ethernet cable — not something I usually take when travelling — I could link my laptop up to the network port next to the USB and TV-out. There’s nothing in the manual about networking, but it would have been fun to sniff around and see what’s connected.

Now, in case you think I’m laid back in some swanky business class booth on some vendor-sponsored junket, let me tell you this is me, next to my partner and offspring, on our way on holiday flying economy. All this stuff is standard in coach class on this bird.

Lord knows what the folk in the fancy seats upstairs have got to play with. Certainly, extra USB ports, RCA jacks and video-in connectors, according to the entertainment guide.

A souped-up seat would also allow me to play the songs on my iPod through the entertainment system. As it stands, my seat can display pictures, PDFs and navigate the files I’ve got stored on a USB stick or hard drive, digital camera or PMP if I had any of these plugged into the system’s USB port.

You can view and edit Office documents too, thanks to the in-flight rig’s inclusion of OpenOffice.

Yes, the entire entertainment system — films, music, games, flight path map, the works — is based on Linux. I know this for a fact — I watched it boot up in verbose mode. It’s Red Hat, in case you were wondering.

If you haven’t brought a laptop with you, there’s a micro Qwerty keyboard on the back of the remote control.

All I’m missing here is an internet connection, so I’ll have to post this when I arrive in Singapore.

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
PEAK APPLE: iOS 8 is least popular Cupertino mobile OS in all of HUMAN HISTORY
'Nerd release' finally staggers past 50 per cent adoption
Tim Cook: The classic iPod HAD to DIE, and this is WHY
Apple, er, couldn’t get the parts for HDD models
Apple spent just ONE DOLLAR beefing up the latest iPad Air 2
New iPads look a lot like the old one. There's a reason for that
Google Glassholes are UNDATEABLE – HP exec
You need an emotional connection, says touchy-feely MD... We can do that
Lawyers mobilise angry mob against Apple over alleged 2011 Macbook Pro crapness
We suffered 'random bouts of graphical distortion' - fanbois
Caterham Seven 160 review: The Raspberry Pi of motoring
Back to driving's basics with a joyously legal high
Back to the ... drawing board: 'Hoverboard' will disappoint Marty McFly wannabes
Buzzing board (and some future apps) leave a lot to be desired
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
How to simplify SSL certificate management
Simple steps to take control of SSL certificates across the enterprise, and recommendations centralizing certificate management throughout their lifecycle.