Feeds

Crooks charge premium for filter-evading Trojan

Chameleon malware from business-minded VXers

New hybrid storage solutions

Cybercrooks have released a custom-built Trojan, dubbed Limbo 2, "guaranteed" by its shady creators to continually evade the top ten anti-virus products on the market.

The Limbo 2 Trojan is touted as being able to bypass products from Symantec, McAfee, AVG and others to steal login credentials from online banking sessions. Crackers hawking tailored versions of the Trojan on underground forums are selling licences for up to $1,300, net security firm PrevX reports. The "guarantee" of non-detection represents a new level of sophistication in the underground malware business, which is borrowing more and more business models from the legitimate software industry.

According to an analysis by PrevX, the Limbo 2 Trojan features a changeable shell. While the payload and end result is the same, this pliable cloak can come in many guises allowing the malware package to present an almost unlimited number of variants. This technology is designed to allow Limbo 2 to slip past conventional signature-based anti-virus detection. Each variant sold is customised to feature the drop site for stolen information.

The Trojan goes beyond conventional key-logging techniques to include technology that generates spoofed information boxes on compromised PCs asking for users to enter more information than usual. Passwords, credit card information and other personal details are transmitted to the malware's owner. One thread about the malware on an underground forum had clocked up more than 15,000 hits, PrevX reports, indicating that the Trojan has generated plenty of interest in the black economy.

"The strength of this piece of Malware lies in its versatility, even if it is recognised up by an anti-virus company it can be changed so as to be invisible again within hours. There are likely to be so many variants out there that they will never all be detected, which is a scary thought as it is designed to steal bank details," said Jacques Erasmus, director of Malware Research at Prevx.

"Whoever designed this Trojan is making a lot of money, probably thousands of pounds every day," he added. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Leak of '5 MEELLLION Gmail passwords' creates security flap
You should be OK if you're not using ANCIENT password
Google recommends pronounceable passwords
Super Chrome goes into battle with Mr Mxyzptlk
Reddit wipes clean leaked celeb nudie pics, tells users to zip it
Now we've had all THAT TRAFFIC, we 'deplore' this theft
Enigmail PGP plugin forgets to encrypt mail sent as blind copies
User now 'waiting for the bad guys come and get me with their water-boards'
YouTube, Amazon and Yahoo! caught in malvertising mess
Cisco says 'Kyle and Stan' attack is spreading through compromised ad networks
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.