Feeds

Nike pulls Air Stab trainers

Outraged knife charities put their foot down

Top three mobile application threats

Nike has decided to withdraw its "Air Stab" range of trainers in the UK in response to "horrified reactions" from consumers and anti-knife charities, the Times reports.

Nike's Air Stab trainer

So far this year, 53 people have been stabbed to death in London alone, the Times notes, and last year "over 5,000 people across Britain were admitted to A&E wards suffering from stab wounds".

A spokesman for the company admitted the name was “obviously unfortunate, given the current issues that we face in the UK", but denied the decision was based on "worries that the name promoted or encouraged the use of knives". He added: “I do not think it might have a bad influence over young people.”

Despite Nike's announcement, Air Stabs were still on sale in Niketown yesterday. A shop assistant told the Times: “The name might seem a bit bad, but it's quite innocent really. They were named before all the recent problems.”

This cut little ice with the obligatory shocked shopper, 25-year-old Fatima Tarkhan, who thundered: “I think it's appalling. They probably treat it as just a gimmick, but it's not the sort of thing that should be made into a joke. It's not funny at all.”

Crimestoppers upped the stunned incredulity quotient by describing itself as “astonished that a major retailer such as Nike could be this naïve and act so irresponsibly with its marketing". The organistation added: "With the current gun and knife epidemic that is sweeping our country we would expect retailers to be taking a more sensitive approach to promoting products to a young and impressionable market.”

Nike is courting further controversy by apparently continuing to punt its "Pocketknife" range - a brand name which the spokesman not unreasonably defended thus: “It's an ACG, or all-conditions gear shoe. You can fold it up and put it in your rucksack. It's all about camping and being outdoors.” ®

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
Spanish village called 'Kill the Jews' mulls rebranding exercise
Not exactly attractive to the Israeli tourist demographic
Oz bank in comedy Heartbleed blog FAIL
Bank: 'We are now safely patched.' Customers: 'You were using OpenSSL?'
Happy 40th Playmobil: Reg looks back at small, rude world of our favourite tiny toys
Little men straddle LOHAN, attend tiny G20 Summit... ah, sweet memories...
Forget the beach 'n' boardwalk, check out the Santa Cruz STEVE JOBS FOUNTAIN
Reg reader snaps shot of touching tribute to Apple icon
Lego is the TOOL OF SATAN, thunders Polish priest
New minifigs like Monster Fighters are turning kids to the dark side
Dark SITH LORD 'Darth Vader' joins battle to rule, er, Ukraine
Only I can 'make an empire out of a republic' intones presidential candidate
Chinese company counters pollution by importing fresh air
Citizens line up for bags of that sweet, sweet mountain air
Google asks April Fools: Want a job? Be our 'Pokemon Master'
Mountain View is prankin' like it's 1999...
prev story

Whitepapers

SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.