Feeds

Verizon's open-door policy yields dip stick

Get your fuel tanks ready

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

The first third-party device has been approved for connection to the Verizon network under the Open Development Initiative, and it's a very exciting electronic dip stick.

Verizon announced last November that it would be approving third-party devices for connection to their network, offering an alternative to buying handsets from the operator. The announcement prompted predictions of Google phones and homebrew handsets, with blogs gushing forth about how anyone could build their own mobile phone and completely change the industry. The reality is, as ever, rather more mundane.

SupplyNet Communications, a 21-person company based in Illinois, has the honour of getting first approval - for an electronic dip stick that sends a text message when tanks of liquid are running low. This is a fine example of just the kind of application that network operators would like to see more of, but hardly a revolution in telecommunications.

Verizon says it has spoken to a few companies about handsets, but most of the approvals will be along the same sort of lines as the electronic dip stick. Operators love that kind of application, as it utilises unused capacity while bringing in regular income. Swiss Telecom once considered embedding mobile phones in every set-top box just for updates, and we'll no doubt see mobes in all sorts of devices in the next few years as operators seek to squeeze every drop of value from their spectrum allocation.

Most of the kit Verizon approves will probably be this sort of embedded application, though we can always the hope the company will give approval to something more interesting.

European readers will have a hard time understanding all this, since the operator-approval model comes with the GSM standard and over here everyone has been free to build GSM kit since its inception. But in the US operators have traditionally had much more control over what's connected to their networks, so an electronic dip stick is still pretty exciting. ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
EE fails to apologise for HUGE T-Mobile outage that hit Brits on Friday
Customer: 'Please change your name to occasionally somewhere'
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?