Feeds

Vendors form alliance to fix DNS poisoning flaw

Giving the good guys a headstart

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

High performance access to file storage

An alliance of software makers and network-hardware vendors announced on Tuesday that they had banded together to fix a fundamental flaw in the design of the internet's address system.

The vulnerability in the domain name system (DNS) - the distributed database that matches a host and domain name with the numerical address of a computer server - could give an attacker the ability to replace the addresses of popular websites with that of a malicious server, said Dan Kaminsky, director of penetration testing for security firm IOActive. Kaminsky found the flaw when he was doing non-security research on the domain name system (DNS) more than six months ago.

"It is a fundamental issue affecting the design," Kaminsky said. "Because the system is behaving exactly like it is supposed to behave, the same bug will show up in vendor after vendor after vendor. This one bug affected not just Microsoft ... not just Cisco, but everyone."

On Tuesday, a number of software and network-hardware vendors released patches for their products. On its regularly scheduled patch day, Microsoft released updates for Windows 2000, Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 to mitigate the issue, which the company ranked an important vulnerability, its second highest grade of severity. Internet Software Consortium, the group responsible for the development of the popular Berkeley Internet Name Domain (BIND) server, also released a patch, confirming that its software contained the vulnerability. Both Cisco and Juniper also acknowledged flawed systems.

Vendors have also provided the fix to certain large clients. Yahoo will be upgrading its name servers from BIND 8 to the latest version of BIND 9, the Internet Software Consortium stated during the conference call. Internet service provider Comcast has already patched its servers for the issue, according to internet infrastructure firm Nominum. Finally, the Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT) Coordination Center has contacted some other nation's response groups to inform them of the problem.

For the most part, however, internet service providers and companies each received the fix on Tuesday, said Sandy Wilbourn, vice president of engineering at Nominum. The goal: To have every major service provider and company apply their software patches in 30 days.

For that reason, don't expect immediate action, Wilbourn said.

"For key customers on our network, we have made a special effort to get them an early release to help solve this problem, and a number of them have finished deployment," he said. "But the nature of this patch is that we wanted to get the vendor side covered and then have deployment over the next 30 days. Anyone that is not patched by today or tomorrow is not doing anything wrong."

The domain-name system (DNS) has been a popular way to attack the internet in the past - it's an ill-kept secret that the DNS system is insecure. The way that many software applications, such as browsers, handle DNS requests has opened up users to attack. Microsoft has fixed a few vulnerabilities in the way Windows handles domain names - issues that could have lead to easier eavesdropping or simpler phishing attacks.

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed
Vendors and ISPs have work to do updating firmware - if it's possible to fix this
OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts
Bloke behind the cockup says not enough people are helping crucial crypto project
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
Heartbleed exploit, inoculation, both released
File under 'this is going to hurt you more than it hurts me'
Parent gabfest Mumsnet hit by SSL bug: My heart bleeds, grins hacker
Natter-board tells middle-class Britain to purée its passwords
Experian subsidiary faces MEGA-PROBE for 'selling consumer data to fraudster'
US attorneys general roll up sleeves, snap on gloves
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.