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Acer punts £199... er... £220... er... Linux laptop

Price clarified upwards

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Acer has clarified its pricing plan for the eagerly awaited Aspire One sub-notebook - and it's clarified the price upwards.

At launch, the company stated the basic version of the Eee PC rival would run Linux, pack in 8GB of solid-state storage and 512MB of memory, and sport a £199 price tag. Company officials stressed that that figure included VAT, the UK's 17.5 per cent sales tax.

No longer. According to ComputerActive magazine that the One's retail price will be £220 including VAT. Indeed, a run through of the few vendors currently listing the One confirms the new price point.

OK, so it's only 20 quids difference, and the One still represents good value when compared to the Eee PC 4G let alone the 900 and the 901, but the news will still come as a blow to Small, Cheap Computer fans awaiting the arrival of the One.

And the pricier Linux and Windows XP versions of the One now seem to be spec'd with 120GB hard drives rather than the 80GB HDD announced at launch.

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