Feeds

JBoss app server 5.0 emerges from hiding

Late date with destiny

New hybrid storage solutions

Red Hat is inching closer to delivery of the long-awaited JBoss Application Server 5.0, but there's still no final release date.

Sacha Labourey, chief technology officer (CTO) for JBoss, has blogged the first release candidate is now frozen and will be available some time this week. He said a further release candidate will be available in six or seven weeks with the final version to "follow closely after".

As El Reg reported last month, the long delay is down to a major redesign and re-write of the JBoss application server to make it more modular. Version 5.0 was originally due in the first half of 2007 and a first beta version has been available since November 2006.

In his detailed blog, Labourey claimed that the delay has not hurt JBoss's position in the market and, while "a number of customers" want version 5.0, he said "most of our customers" are happy with the level of support for Java Enterprise Edition (Java EE) 5.0 available in the current version of the application sever, version 4.2.

Despite Labourey's optimism, the world of Java-based application servers has changed substantially during the last two years. Oracle has purchased BEA Systems in a move that has raised a question mark over the future of at least one of JBoss's proprietary competitors - Oracle's application server. But the emergence of SpringSource as a serious open source contender in the Java application server market in April must also be a cause for concern.

At the same time IBM's WebSphere has moved through several iterations with upgrades to its support for Web Services and Enterprise Java Beans (EJB) 3.0.

Beyond the Java world, Microsoft has completed major upgrades for .NET with version 3.5 and Internet Information Services, version 7.0, in the same time frame.

If Red Hat actually manages to meet its promise to deliver version 5.0 of this long-awaited application server sometime soon it might be a case of too much, too late.®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Not appy with your Chromebook? Well now it can run Android apps
Google offers beta of tricky OS-inside-OS tech
Greater dev access to iOS 8 will put us AT RISK from HACKERS
Knocking holes in Apple's walled garden could backfire, says securo-chap
NHS grows a NoSQL backbone and rips out its Oracle Spine
Open source? In the government? Ha ha! What, wait ...?
Google extends app refund window to two hours
You now have 120 minutes to finish that game instead of 15
Intel: Hey, enterprises, drop everything and DO HADOOP
Big Data analytics projected to run on more servers than any other app
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.