Feeds

Family Guy creator's sellout to Google almost complete

Two minute clips served with your ads

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Google is revealing new details on the recruitment of Family Guy creator Seth MacFarlane to attract prime-time television advertising dollars to web-only video content.

In September, the search giant plans to roll out a series of animated clips funded by its AdSense network called "Seth MacFarlane's Cavalcade of Cartoon Comedy," according to the New York Times.

The story of a MacFarlane/Google advertising matchup has been swimming around the 'net for about a year — so the Gotham rag is a bit late to the punch. But it has gathered up some details on the pact which are interesting.

The original video shorts will serve as a flagship for the Google Content Network, which has until now has only experimented with in-stream video ads. Google's plan for securing massive advertising figures for video content is to bring the content to the user, rather than the other way around.

Cavalcade is described to The Times as "animated versions of the one-frame cartoons you might see in The New Yorker, only edgier". So, er, the bar has been set pretty low.

The shorts will be embedded on thousands of independent web sites frequented by MacFarlane's target audience (young men under 30) as free, ad-supported streams.

The series will be funded by advertising put into the feed via a mix of pre-roll ads, video banners, and "brought to you by..." messages prefacing the clips, according to The Times. MacFarlane will also offer to animate original commercials for a more substantial fee.

Google and MacFarlane aren't saying which advertisers are currently onboard with the idea, although they claim several deals mark the largest AdSense buys ever.

“What is exciting is that this is a way to monetize the Internet immediately. Instead of creating a Web site and hoping Seth’s fans find it, we are going to push the content to where people are already at,” said Karl Austen, a lawyer who worked on the deal, speaking to The Times.

MacFarlane has already created 50 "episodes" for the campaign, which run about two minutes each. So that's a clip with at least 1/3 of the time dedicated to advertising if it uses a pre-roll commercial slot. Perhaps a bit tedious for an audience — but easy money in the bank for MacFarlane. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Scrapping the Human Rights Act: What about privacy and freedom of expression?
Justice minister's attack to destroy ability to challenge state
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
EU to accuse Ireland of giving Apple an overly peachy tax deal – report
Probe expected to say single-digit rate was unlawful
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
Hey Brit taxpayers. You just spent £4m on Central London ‘innovation playground’
Catapult me a Mojito, I feel an Digital Innovation coming on
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
EU probes Google’s Android omerta again: Talk now, or else
Spill those Android secrets, or we’ll fine you
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.