Feeds

Available to buy: your own frakkin' 7ft Cylon

Oh, for the love of Gods

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

If you're a really, really big fan of the recent reinterpretation of Battlestar Galactica and have $8000 not doing anything, you could invest in your very own 7ft-tall Cylon Centurion.

According to Sideshow Collectibles, each one is hand-built by a gentleman called Fred Barton of Fred Barton Productions, Los Angeles. And it's all approved and everything by Universal Studios.

Click for full-size image

By your command...

The towering replica features the "haunting visor light of the robotic soldier synchronized to the menacing, eerie hum" of the machine determined to destroy mankind.

A non-refundable, one-time deposit of $3950 (£1987) is required to purchase the Cylon Centurion from the series - surely the best sci-fi since Babylon 5. Go on, argue it, you know you want to...

The life-size figure costs $7900 (£3975) and is constructed from a fibreglass body with hand-machined aluminium, brass and acrylic detail. It's shipped approximately eight weeks after order, presumably that's how long it takes to make one.

It says here that shipping costs aren't included - oh, felgercarb...

Security for virtualized datacentres

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.