Feeds

Scareware package greets marks by name

Fakeale redux

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Malware authors have created a strain of scareware packages that lifts the name of an infected user from the registry of an infected PC in order to create more convincing scams.

The wife of reader Chris came across the ruse when she used his PC to check on her Hotmail account. Before she could get onto the website she was confronted by a pop-up message saying "Chris [surname], your computer is infected with a Trojan, you should download this spyware removal tool (recommended)" and giving a yes/no option.

"I immediately closed it and am now running a scan to see what is causing this, but what was more concerning, and the reason that I am writing this to you, is that the perp of this malware/spyware/phishing attack has managed to write a program which can check the name that windows is registered to, to make it appear genuine," Chris told El Reg.

"This seems a really scary prospect to me, and I am IT savvy, but imagine Mr or Miss Average JoeShmo presented with that."

The malicious behaviour is identical to the Fakeale Trojan first spotted by net security firm Sophos last week. Carole Theriault, senior security consultant at Sophos, explained that the malware takes the user's name from the registry in order to craft a tailored warning message.

Fakeale Trojan false alarm

Users who respond to the come-on are taken the the website of an outfit punting a rogue anti-malware product. They are then told that their PC is infected with malware - even if it is clean - in a bid to frighten them into buying a product identified by Sophos as IE Defender installer.

Goes down badly: results of the scan of a clean machine

Bogus warnings that attempt to trick users into purchasing "anti-malware tools" and have little or no security utility have been around for some time. The Paleale Trojan only differs in the use of trickery to make the unpalatable scam more convincing. ®

Bootnote

Thanks for Fraser Howard in Sophos Labs for the screenshots.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
One HUNDRED FAMOUS LADIES exposed NUDE online
Celebrity women victimised as Apple iCloud accounts reportedly popped
Rubbish WPS config sees WiFi router keys popped in seconds
Another day, another way in to your home router
Goog says patch⁵⁰ your Chrome
64-bit browser loads cat vids FIFTEEN PERCENT faster!
NZ Justice Minister scalped as hacker leaks emails
Grab your popcorn: Subterfuge and slur disrupts election run up
HP: NORKS' cyber spying efforts actually a credible cyberthreat
'Sophisticated' spies, DIY tech and a TROLL ARMY – report
NIST to sysadmins: clean up your SSH mess
Too many keys, too badly managed
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
Attack flogged through shiny-clicky social media buttons
66,000 users popped by malicious Flash fudging add-on
New Snowden leak: How NSA shared 850-billion-plus metadata records
'Federated search' spaffed info all over Five Eyes chums
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.