Feeds

Salesforce.com marches on IBM's Notes business

Follows Microsoft into battle

Security for virtualized datacentres

After more than a decade of seeing its massive Lotus Notes business threatened by Microsoft, IBM faces a new threat: Salesforce.com.

Salesforce.com is planning tools that will convert applications and data in Notes to run on its hosted platform. The on-demand provider is also working actively with Google and reaping the benefits of efforts by Microsoft to have customers replace Notes with Exchange for their email.

It's the latest assault on the mighty Notes customer base, estimated at some 140 million licenses.

Microsoft initiated a war of attrition against Notes with the launch of Exchange in 1996. Among the weapons used: tools that migrated email data and applications to Exchange. Notes is, of course, the great brain child of Microsoft's current chief software architect Ray Ozzie.

Adam Gross, Salesforce.com's vice president of platform marketing, told The Register on Monday that Salesforce.com is working on a set of Notes-specific conversion tools. These would migrate Notes applications' data and schema to run on Salesforce.com's hosted Force.com service.

Gross did not provide further details, but it seems likely Salesforce.com is targeting Notes applications such as e-forms. Once converted, data and information could be sucked into the Force.com platform and used in on-demand applications from Salesforce.com and partners whose applications run on Force.com.

Salesforce.com chairman Marc Benioff, meanwhile, told The Register Notes is losing favor with CIOs after years of IBM pitching itself as a provider of e-services and not meeting expectations. According to Benioff, CIOs are turning to the combo of Google on email and collaboration with Gmail, Calendar and Google Docs, and Salesforce.com for applications.

Salesforce.com is also benefiting from organizations that abandon IBM's Lotus email for Microsoft Exchange. Such migrations are leaving the Lotus applications hanging, with IT teams reluctant to continue their support and development. Gross said Notes is the application Salesforce.com is replacing most.

Salesforce.com has, itself, moved to Google Docs internally along with Gmail for its 3,000 employees. The company had been using Microsoft.®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft on the Threshold of a new name for Windows next week
Rebranded OS reportedly set to be flung open by Redmond
Business is back, baby! Hasta la VISTA, Win 8... Oh, yeah, Windows 9
Forget touchscreen millennials, Microsoft goes for mouse crowd
SMASH the Bash bug! Apple and Red Hat scramble for patch batches
'Applying multiple security updates is extremely difficult'
Apple: SO sorry for the iOS 8.0.1 UPDATE BUNGLE HORROR
Apple kills 'upgrade'. Hey, Microsoft. You sure you want to be like these guys?
ARM gives Internet of Things a piece of its mind – the Cortex-M7
32-bit core packs some DSP for VIP IoT CPU LOL
Lotus Notes inventor Ozzie invents app to talk to people on your phone
Imagine that. Startup floats with voice collab app for Win iPhone
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.