Feeds

Google preps conflict of interest-tastic web analytics tool

Have you thought about giving your money to Google, sir?

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Mark this as an escalation of Google's recent skirmish with the web analytics industry: the search omnicorp is launching a free tool to target surfers that will compete with subscription services offered by comScore and Nielsen.

From today Google will offer shiny-suited types the tool, dubbed AdPlanner, to help them find the corners of the web where their target market might be hanging out. The New York Times reports that it will throw together data from audience measurement (Google Analytics, Google Toolbar etc), web searches, and third parties to build a picture of where advertisers will get the best results.

The product is being widely interpreted as targeting Nielsen and comScore's business. It's likely to raise market dominance concerns, as a popular analytics suite could allow Google to increase its already massive sway over the online advertising market. It'll mean the dominant company flogging ads online is also the company telling advertisers where to place them. Which seems a nice racket to be in.

The Wall Street Journal reports no reaction to the news from Nielsen or comScore today, but the fact that AdPlanner will be free, at least to begin with, is sure to send chills down their spines.

Indeed, conspiracy theorists at comScore might wonder whether its recent spat with Google over paid-for clicks, which by most accounts comScore lost, was a set up:

  1. Analytics company reckons Google clicks are down
  2. Google proves it wrong to much embarrassment
  3. Google launches rival to analytics product

Last week Google also released Trends for Websites, another free measurement effort it describes as "a fun tool that gives you a view of how popular your favorite websites are". We're not sure where the "fun" lies, but it allows webmasters to examine the popularity of websites.

The principle and sources of data for Trends for Websites are similar to AdPlanner, but the output is comparative rather than the hard(er) numbers demanded by ad agencies. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Microsoft refuses to nip 'Windows 9' unzip lip slip
Look at the shiny Windows 8.1, why can't you people talk about 8.1, sobs an exec somewhere
Intel's Raspberry Pi rival Galileo can now run Windows
Behold the Internet of Things. Wintel Things
Linux Foundation says many Linux admins and engineers are certifiable
Floats exam program to help IT employers lock up talent
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Eat up Martha! Microsoft slings handwriting recog into OneNote on Android
Freehand input on non-Windows kit for the first time
Linux kernel devs made to finger their dongles before contributing code
Two-factor auth enabled for Kernel.org repositories
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?