Feeds

The Casey Report: Putting your mouth, not brain, in charge

Evidence-based policy thoroughly decked

Maximizing your infrastructure through virtualization

There is, too, the continued undermining of our legal protections. The report persists in juxtaposing the rights of criminals vs. those of the law-abiding. In so doing, it neatly overlooks the fact that protections such as jury trial and habeas corpus exist first and foremost to protect the innocent.

Second, there is a real whiff of Captain Renault here. He – as those who know their filmography will recall – was the police chief in Casablanca. Needing an excuse to close down Rick’s bar, he exclaims “I'm shocked, shocked to find that gambling is going on in here!”, before turning round to pick up his winnings.

It would be very nice to return to credible independent statistics – for all the notice the public will take of them. But it should not be forgotten that it was the present government that neutered the Office of National Statistics – thereby reducing the credibility of what had previously been a gold-star statistical service.

Ditto paperwork and management targets. They are disliked by police and public alike, but they did not just happen. This government played a very large part in creating them and the culture in which they survive.

Finally, the report also points out that the public is worried by “disrespect, disorder and anti-social behaviour”. This therefore makes it all the more peculiar that such a report should have been entrusted to the doyenne of civil service yobbery, Louise Casey.

She is usually referred to as someone who likes to get results. She is assertive – and that assertiveness has been known to express itself in thuggish form. Back in 2005, Tony Blair intervened to save her from a disciplinary inquiry. This was after she allegedly made a foul-mouthed speech ridiculing government initiatives on binge-drinking.

Her attitude to research and evidence is neatly summed up by her much-quoted declaration that “If No. 10 says bloody 'evidence-based policy' to me one more time I'll deck them”. Quite apart from the implied threat, it is not a healthy attitude to be held by someone trusted with a major item of government research.

But then, as Ms Casey admits: “Doing things sober is no way to get things done”.

This could explain a great deal. ®

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION
Environmental activist walks free after hoax sent share price over a cliff
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.