Feeds

Naomi Campbell pleads guilty to assault

Court adjourns to consider sentence

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

WSA Naomi Campbell this morning pleaded guilty to "three counts of assaulting a constable and one count of disorderly conduct likely to cause harassment, alarm or distress" at Uxbridge Magistrates' Court, the BBC reports.

The battling Streatham clotheshorse was hauled before the beak following a 3 April incident at Heathrow's Terminal 5 which saw her hauled off an LA-bound British Airways flight in an unseemly spat regarding a mislaid item of luggage.

The prosecution said that "problems started on the aircraft when Ms Campbell was told an item that belonged to her was among luggage which had gone missing". Melanie Parrish, prosecuting, explained that Campbell, 38, had been travelling in first class and was initially "very friendly".

The aircraft's captain Miles Sutherland was informed that "not all the luggage had been put on the plane because of teething problems at the new terminal".

Parrish continued: "Miss Campbell, having heard this, approached the cabin crew and asked them to make inquiries about the state of her baggage. Regrettably it was confirmed one of her items was one of those not loaded.

"Having heard that Miss Campbell had been affected by the baggage difficulties, he [Captain Sutherland] took the unusual decision to come and speak with her and explain the situation and make his apologies."

Campbell then "became upset" the court heard, then "swore at the captain and said she wanted him to get off the plane and get her bag". As he walked away, Campbell said: "You are a racist, you wouldn't be doing this if I was white."

Police intervention was required to oblige Campbell to leave the flight, and she was subsequently charged on the aforementioned four counts and two further counts of "using threatening, abusive words or behaviour to cabin crew". She also pleaded guilty to the latter today.

Before the hearing, Campbell's spokesman Alan Edwards said: "She feels what happened was regrettable and she has come to court today to put her side of the story."

The court was adjourned "while sentencing was considered", the BBC concludes. ®

Update:

Ms Campbell has been sentenced to 200 hours community service, the Beeb reports. She must also pay fines totaling £2,300, as well as compensation to the police officers and the captain.

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
Holy vintage vehicles! Earliest known official Batmobile goes on sale
Riddle me this: are you prepared to pay US$180k?
Criticism of Uber's journo-Data Analytics plan is an Attack on DIGITAL FREEDOM
First they came for Emil – and I'm damn well SPEAKING OUT
'It is comforting to know where your data centres are.' UK.GOV does NOT
Plus: Anons are 'wannabes', KKK says, before being pwned
'Open source just means big companies can steal your code.' O RLY?
Plus: Flame of the Week returns, for one night only!
NEWSFLASH: It's time to ditch dullard Facebook chums
Everything hot in tech, courtesy of avian anchor Regina Eggbert
Hey, you, PHONE-FACE! Kickstarter in-car mobe mount will EMBED your phone into your MUG
Stick it on the steering wheel and wait for the airbag to fire
Bible THUMP: Good Book beats Darwin to most influential tome title
Folio Society crowns fittest of surviving volumes
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Driving business with continuous operational intelligence
Introducing an innovative approach offered by ExtraHop for producing continuous operational intelligence.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?