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Snoop bill opponents post Swedish spy IDs on net

Even Google condemns eavesdropping bill

The chief of Sweden's defense intelligence agency admitted Thursday that about 20 of its staff members have had personal information about themselves posted on the internet as part of a mud-slinging campaign. According to Swedish blog Politikerbloggen the information included addresses, phone numbers and even credit card numbers.

On Wednesday, a far-reaching eavesdropping law granted Sweden's intelligence agency National Defence Radio Establishment the right to scan all international phone calls and emails in a move to combat terror plots.

Wednesday's vote has angered many in Sweden and abroad, including even former members of SÄPO (the Swedish FBI) and the Justice Department. Some experts insist that it is almost impossible to differentiate between domestic and international traffic.

Sweden's Pirate Party, which strongly defends bittorrent site The Pirate Bay, says it will take the country to the European Court of Human Rights because the law is a clear breach of the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms.

Google's global privacy counsel Peter Fleischer believes the Swedish government is following the examples set by governments ranging from China to Saudi Arabia. Swedish telecom company TeliaSonera condemned the law as well, calling it the most far-reaching eavesdropping plan in Europe. ®

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