Feeds
85%

Nokia N78

Nokia's newest N-series quad-band candybar

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Navi-wheel is a small innovation perhaps, but it's one that makes the navpad very intuitive to use and you end up using it without realising what a good job it’s doing. You can access the menus via the usual Symbian menu button or a dedicated Applications button which stands out asymmetrically next to the navpad. This calls up an iPod Touch-style interface that allows you to flick through your applications the way the Touch lets you flick through your album covers. Nice. A long press on the side-mounted shutter button gets you into camera mode.

The 3.2-megapixel camera features a lens with the Carl Zeiss name that Nokia is always so fond of dropping. Whatever. Whether it’s the lens or something else, the pictures are clear and generally sharp, with rich colours and a good sense of scale. It has a proper LED flash too, rather than a photo light, though you’ll still need to be fairly close to your subject for it to be effective.

Nokia N78

The 3.2 megapixel camera is complemented by an LED flash

The usual editing options we’ve come to expect from the N-series are all there, allowing you to add effects, text, crop and rotate your pics as well as reduce red-eye – a neat little on-board editing suite in other words. There are also options for shutter timer, burst mode, brightness settings and an on-screen grid that helps you centre your composition when you’re lining up your snaps.

All it needs is the multi-shot BestPic facility from Sony Ericsson’s Cyber-shot range and you’ve got pretty much everything you’d expect from a modern cameraphone - bar a couple more million pixels maybe.

And this being a 3G phone, there’s also a secondary camera at the front for video calling.

The N78's Assisted GPS (A-GPS) system not only tells you where you are, but can also automatically add location data to any pictures you take – handy for uploading to sites like Flickr or Nokia’s own Share On Ovi online piccy service. The Nokia Maps feature is well integrated with the satnav, and the bundled 2GB Micro SD card comes with an impressive library of world maps.

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know
'Missy' Cummings on UAVs, smartcars and dying from boredom
Don't wait for that big iPad, order a NEXUS 9 instead, industry little bird says
Google said to debut next big slab, Android L ahead of Apple event
Xperia Z3: Crikey, Sony – ANOTHER flagship phondleslab?
The Fourth Amendment... and it IS better
Netscape Navigator - the browser that started it all - turns 20
It was 20 years ago today, Marc Andreeesen taught the band to play
A drone of one's own: Reg buyers' guide for UAV fanciers
Hardware: Check. Software: Huh? Licence: Licence...?
The Apple launch AS IT HAPPENED: Totally SERIOUS coverage, not for haters
Fandroids, Windows Phone fringe-oids – you wouldn't understand
Apple SILENCES Bose, YANKS headphones from stores
The, er, Beats go on after noise-cancelling spat
Here's your chance to buy an ancient, working APPLE ONE
Warning: Likely to cost a lot even for a Mac
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.