Feeds

British Columbia stray foot tally hits six

Latest find size 10, wearing Adidas

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

The British Columbia stray foot tally yesterday reached a round half dozen with the discovery of a size 10 right foot wearing a black Adidias trainer which turned up on a beach in Vancouver Island.

According to CTV, the foot was found by a woman collecting rocks who quickly ran for help and encountered one Sandra Malone, who recounted: "I got the chills right away. You know, I got pretty grossed out."

The Canadian foot mystery began last August when two right feet came ashore on small islands north of Vancouver. Another right foot was discovered in February, May saw the fourth wash up on a suburban Vancouver beach, while a fifth - and to date the only left foot - was reported on Monday.

Of the latest grisly find, RCMP Sgt. Mike Tresoor said: "The object will ultimately be examined by a forensic pathologist in attempts to determine the source of the foot and if it is related to other feet recently found."

British Columbia's chief coroner Terry Smith said earlier this week that foul play is not suspected in any of the six cases "because there does not appear to be any evidence the bones were severed". He said: "There is no other process going on other than disarticulation of the feet.''

Investigators are probing whether any of the feet belong to four victims of a Februry 2005 plane crash, including two brothers of Kevin DeCock who's spent the last three years "trying to find their remains, navigating a complex system of channels and currents and calculating where the tides may have taken the bodies".

The coroner's office has asked family members of the crash victims for DNA samples to establish a possible link, and Dr Gail Anderson of the Simon Fraser University Centre for Forensic Research said that while some of the feet might indeed belong to the disappeared quartet, "they could belong to any number of victims lost at sea".

She concluded: "We could be looking at an incident that didn't even officially happen in our waters. It could be one of those massive international boats that goes through this area." ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Apple's Mr Havisham: Tim Cook says dead Steve Jobs' office has remained untouched
'I literally think about him every day' says biz baron's old friend
Flaming drone batteries ground commercial flight before takeoff
Passenger had Something To Declare, instead fiddled while plane burned
Cops apologise for leaving EXPLOSIVES in suitcase at airport
'Canine training exercise' SNAFU sees woman take home booming baggage
Every billionaire needs a PANZER TANK, right? STOP THERE, Paul Allen
Angry Microsoftie hauls auctioneers to court over stalled Pzkw. IV 'deal'
Jony Ive: Apple iWatch will SCREW UP Switzerland's economy
Apple's chief designer forgot one crucial point about overpriced bling
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.